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2Physics Quote:
"About 200 femtoseconds after you started reading this line, the first step in actually seeing it took place. In the very first step of vision, the retinal chromophores in the rhodopsin proteins in your eyes were photo-excited and then driven through a conical intersection to form a trans isomer [1]. The conical intersection is the crucial part of the machinery that allows such ultrafast energy flow. Conical intersections (CIs) are the crossing points between two or more potential energy surfaces."
-- Adi Natan, Matthew R Ware, Vaibhav S. Prabhudesai, Uri Lev, Barry D. Bruner, Oded Heber, Philip H Bucksbaum
(Read Full Article: "Demonstration of Light Induced Conical Intersections in Diatomic Molecules" )

Sunday, February 13, 2005

Physics Book Recommendation

[Category: Semi-popular]

"The First Three Minutes: A modern view of the origin of the Universe"
- Steven Weinberg
[1993 Publisher: Basic Books, NY]

Steven Weinberg won Nobel Prize in 1979 with Sheldon Glashow
and Abdus Salam for their path-breaking work on unifying
Electromagnetic and Weak Nuclear interactions in matter
[read our next posting]. He is Josey Professor of Science and
Astronomy at University of Texas at Austin.

This book came out first in 1977 and became an instant hit among
all people interested in Physics and other people who were just
wondering about this Universe and its origin but was not getting
something that could tell them this story spanning a large spectrum
of Physics topics.

Weinberg gives a frame-by-frame almost movie-like account of
what happened in those very crucial first few moments after the
Big Bang as we understand and guess from what we know or
understand from General Physics and Astrophysical observations.

This book is a great synthesis of cosmology, particle physics and
Astrophysics and tells the story in great style.

We put this in "Semi-popular" category because some exposure
to College-level Science is needed in order to fully appreciate the
greatness of the content of this classic book.


1 Comments:

At 4:41 AM, Blogger oceanskies79 said...

Thanks for the blog. The topic of the origin of the Universe sounds interesting. What I fear though is that I may not have sufficient prior knowledge to understand the concepts through lay-man language. Perhaps you could write a short summary of this topic in lay-man language to help people like me along? Thanks.

 

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