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2Physics Quote:
"Today’s most precise time measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks, which achieve a precision of about 10-18, corresponding to 1 second uncertainty in more than 15 billion years, a time span which is longer than the age of the universe... Despite such stunning precision, these clocks could be outperformed by a different type of clock, the so called “nuclear clock”... The expected factor of improvement in precision of such a new type of clock has been estimated to be up to 100, in this way pushing the ability of time measurement to the next level."
-- Lars von der Wense, Benedict Seiferle, Mustapha Laatiaoui, Jürgen B. Neumayr, Hans-Jörg Maier, Hans-Friedrich Wirth, Christoph Mokry, Jörg Runke, Klaus Eberhardt, Christoph E. Düllmann, Norbert G. Trautmann, Peter G. Thirolf
(Read Full Article: "Direct Detection of the 229Th Nuclear Clock Transition"

Sunday, February 13, 2005

Physics Book Recommendation

[Category: Semi-popular]

"The First Three Minutes: A modern view of the origin of the Universe"
- Steven Weinberg
[1993 Publisher: Basic Books, NY]

Steven Weinberg won Nobel Prize in 1979 with Sheldon Glashow
and Abdus Salam for their path-breaking work on unifying
Electromagnetic and Weak Nuclear interactions in matter
[read our next posting]. He is Josey Professor of Science and
Astronomy at University of Texas at Austin.

This book came out first in 1977 and became an instant hit among
all people interested in Physics and other people who were just
wondering about this Universe and its origin but was not getting
something that could tell them this story spanning a large spectrum
of Physics topics.

Weinberg gives a frame-by-frame almost movie-like account of
what happened in those very crucial first few moments after the
Big Bang as we understand and guess from what we know or
understand from General Physics and Astrophysical observations.

This book is a great synthesis of cosmology, particle physics and
Astrophysics and tells the story in great style.

We put this in "Semi-popular" category because some exposure
to College-level Science is needed in order to fully appreciate the
greatness of the content of this classic book.


At 4:41 AM, Blogger oceanskies79 said...

Thanks for the blog. The topic of the origin of the Universe sounds interesting. What I fear though is that I may not have sufficient prior knowledge to understand the concepts through lay-man language. Perhaps you could write a short summary of this topic in lay-man language to help people like me along? Thanks.


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