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2Physics Quote:
"Today’s most precise time measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks, which achieve a precision of about 10-18, corresponding to 1 second uncertainty in more than 15 billion years, a time span which is longer than the age of the universe... Despite such stunning precision, these clocks could be outperformed by a different type of clock, the so called “nuclear clock”... The expected factor of improvement in precision of such a new type of clock has been estimated to be up to 100, in this way pushing the ability of time measurement to the next level."
-- Lars von der Wense, Benedict Seiferle, Mustapha Laatiaoui, Jürgen B. Neumayr, Hans-Jörg Maier, Hans-Friedrich Wirth, Christoph Mokry, Jörg Runke, Klaus Eberhardt, Christoph E. Düllmann, Norbert G. Trautmann, Peter G. Thirolf
(Read Full Article: "Direct Detection of the 229Th Nuclear Clock Transition"

Thursday, May 05, 2005

Feynman on Commemorative Stamp

Richard P. Feynman, the late Nobel laureate and Caltech professor, is
widely regarded as one of the most influential physicists of the 20th
Century. Today United States Post Office has released a commemorative
stamp in honor of this great Physicist of 20th century.

Anyone interested in Modern Physics could never escape reading about
Feynman and his path-breaking works especially on Quantum
Electrodynamics and many other aspects of particle physics. The series
of lectures that he gave to Caltech undergraduates is celebrated as the
most comprehensive account of Modern Physics and if you have not yet
read his autobiography "Surely you are joking, Mr. Feynman" and a
sequel "What do you care what other people say", you must finish those
right now!

We cannot really describe Feynman, his work and his spectacular life in
two or three paragraphs of this posting. So, you may start with those books.Posted by Hello


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