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2Physics Quote:
"Today’s most precise time measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks, which achieve a precision of about 10-18, corresponding to 1 second uncertainty in more than 15 billion years, a time span which is longer than the age of the universe... Despite such stunning precision, these clocks could be outperformed by a different type of clock, the so called “nuclear clock”... The expected factor of improvement in precision of such a new type of clock has been estimated to be up to 100, in this way pushing the ability of time measurement to the next level."
-- Lars von der Wense, Benedict Seiferle, Mustapha Laatiaoui, Jürgen B. Neumayr, Hans-Jörg Maier, Hans-Friedrich Wirth, Christoph Mokry, Jörg Runke, Klaus Eberhardt, Christoph E. Düllmann, Norbert G. Trautmann, Peter G. Thirolf
(Read Full Article: "Direct Detection of the 229Th Nuclear Clock Transition"

Tuesday, July 19, 2005

Through Einstein's Eyes

Relativistic ride on a roller coaster &
On a desert road at relativistic speed (0.76 times the speed of light)

If you love relativity and get amazed thinking about all its seemingly wierd
concepts and consequences, you would surely like the following websites of
the Physics department of Australian National University (ANU):

Seeing Relativity :
The Australian National University relativistic visualization project has
used supercomputers to simulate what we might see in a world where the
effects of Einstein's theory of special relativity are everyday experiences.
You can also download two extended relativistic optics videos,
Visualizing Special Relativity, and Seeing Relativity, in RealPlayer format.
A complete printer-friendly commentary is also available for the videos.

Through Einstein's Eyes Online :
You may also visit the Through Einstein's Eyes site to find out about their
latest multimedia work on relativistic visualisation.



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