.comment-link {margin-left:.6em;}

2Physics Quote:
"Many of the molecules found by ROSINA DFMS in the coma of comet 67P are compatible with the idea that comets delivered key molecules for prebiotic chemistry throughout the solar system and in particular to the early Earth increasing drastically the concentration of life-related chemicals by impact on a closed water body. The fact that glycine was most probably formed on dust grains in the presolar stage also makes these molecules somehow universal, which means that what happened in the solar system could probably happen elsewhere in the Universe."
-- Kathrin Altwegg and the ROSINA Team

(Read Full Article: "Glycine, an Amino Acid and Other Prebiotic Molecules in Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko"
)

Saturday, August 20, 2005

Reports on Light

Photon Clock: Applied physicists
at the California Institute of
Technology have created a tiny disk
that vibrates steadily like a tuning
fork while it is pumped with light.
This is the first micro-mechanical
device that has been operated at a
steady frequency by the action of
photons alone. Reporting in
recently published issues of the
journals Optics Express (July 11) and
Physical Review Letters (June 10 and
July 11), Kerry Vahala and group
members explained how the tiny,
disk-shaped resonator made of silica
can be made to vibrate mechanically
when hit by laser light. The disk,
which is less than the width of a
human hair, vibrates about 80 million
times per second when its rim is
pumped with light.

Controlling Light: A discovery by
Princeton researchers may lead to an
efficient method for controlling the transmission of light and improve new
generations of communications technologies powered by light rather than
electricity. The discovery could be used to develop new structures that
would work in the same fashion as an elbow joint in plumbing by enabling
light to make sharp turns as it travels through photonic circuits. Fiber-optic
cables currently used in computers, televisions and other devices can
transport light rapidly and efficiently, but cannot bend at sharp angles.
Information in the light pulses has to be converted back into cumbersome
electrical signals before they can be sorted and redirected to their proper
destinations. The results are reported in Aug. 18 issue of Nature.

Controlling Light Speed: A team of researchers from the Ecole
Polytechnique Federale in Lausanne, Switzerland have successfully
demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to control the speed of
light in an optical fiber. Their findings, published in Applied Physics
Letters, could have implications ranging from optical computing to the
fiber-optic telecommunications industry. The researchers were able to
slow light down and speed it up as well. The phenomenon could have
profound technological consequences in controlling the speed of light in a
simple optical fiber.

Labels: ,


1 Comments:

At 8:04 AM, Blogger oceanskies79 said...

This is something I could understand some bare minimum. I am often amazed by light itself. Thanks.

 

Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link