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2Physics Quote:
"Today’s most precise time measurements are performed with optical atomic clocks, which achieve a precision of about 10-18, corresponding to 1 second uncertainty in more than 15 billion years, a time span which is longer than the age of the universe... Despite such stunning precision, these clocks could be outperformed by a different type of clock, the so called “nuclear clock”... The expected factor of improvement in precision of such a new type of clock has been estimated to be up to 100, in this way pushing the ability of time measurement to the next level."
-- Lars von der Wense, Benedict Seiferle, Mustapha Laatiaoui, Jürgen B. Neumayr, Hans-Jörg Maier, Hans-Friedrich Wirth, Christoph Mokry, Jörg Runke, Klaus Eberhardt, Christoph E. Düllmann, Norbert G. Trautmann, Peter G. Thirolf
(Read Full Article: "Direct Detection of the 229Th Nuclear Clock Transition"

Saturday, September 03, 2005

ITER's Tokamak

The most advanced approach to fusion involves
using magnetic fields to confine the deuterium
–tritium plasma. This is the route to be taken by
International Thermonuclear Experimental
Reactor (ITER), which will build a fusion reactor
at Cadarache in the south of France [ITER is an
international coallition among China, the European
Union (EU), Japan, Russia, South Korea and the
US]. The project will cost $10 billion to build and
run. ITER will use magnetic fields generated by
superconducting coils to confine a plasma of
deuterium and tritium in a donut-shaped chamber
called a Tokamak. The plasma will be heated to a temperature of 100
million degrees so that the deuterium and tritium nuclei can overcome
their mutual repulsion and undergo nuclear fusion.


At 8:02 AM, Blogger oceanskies79 said...

I read this for a while, and I suppose my physics has yet to be so good that I could understand the concepts behind. It would be helpful if charts or figures could be used. I am more visual.


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