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2Physics Quote:
"Eckhard D. Falkenberg, who found evidence of an annual oscillation in the beta-decay rate of tritium, was either the first or one of the first to propose that some beta-decay rates may be variable. He suggested that the beta-decay process may be influenced by neutrinos, and attributed the annual variation to the varying Earth-Sun distance that leads to a corresponding variation in the flux of solar neutrinos as detected on Earth. Supporting evidence for the variability of beta-decay rates could be found in the results of an experiment carried out at the Brookhaven National Laboratory."
-- Peter A. Sturrock, Ephraim Fischbach, Jeffrey D. Scargle

(Read Full Article: "Indications of an Influence of Solar Neutrinos on Beta Decays"
)

Sunday, August 16, 2015

"Secrets of the Universe"

2Physics.com is partnering with K2 Communications, a global leader in the production and distribution of IMAX films, which is currently working on the production of a IMAX 3D documentary film titled "Secrets of the Universe". K2 Communications has been commissioned by the National Science Foundation (NSF) by way of a substantial grant to promote the pursuit of an education and/or career in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics) by inspiring an appreciation for science through the amazing discoveries in the world of particle physics.

The plan is to do this through a spectacular IMAX 3D experience titled "Secrets of the Universe" that will explore some of the most elusive and fascinating phenomena in the cosmos under investigation at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, Switzerland, and explain today’s advance scientific discoveries in layman's terms. With greater understanding and enthusiasm from the general public, we can expect greater support and progress for STEM.

The film will address, more specifically, the exciting possibilities for discovery during the second run currently under way at the LHC: research on dark matter, antimatter, and parallel universes that has the potential to turn science fiction into science fact. Perhaps most importantly, it will feature the science and engineering feat that is the Large Hadron Collider - arguably humankind’s greatest machine - as a monument to how technology and research build off each other to create perpetual progress.

Multiple award-winning Director Stephen Low – a veteran of more than 15 giant screen documentaries – will lead the film team that includes the highly acclaimed IMAX cinematographer Sean Phillips.



Here is the Link to the "Secrets of the Universe" campaign >>

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